20.9.17

Session II

Extra hatches and LMGs

I started by gluing some small railing bits behind where the rear turrets would end up living, and apparently some kind of exhaust pipe -covering strange structures. Right after that I had to spend some good time searching for my pointy-tipped tweezers, as I realized that my fingers were a bit too large for the accurate installation tiniest of pieces. The on-deck tools were also installed at this point already, or some of them at least: a saw, a pickaxe and some sort of a metal bar (lower front in the last image).

The rest of my session time was spent on the Emma production line, the kit was going to have as many as five pan-type drum-magazine DT light machine guns. Emma is the name that these things were known here in Finland back in the day (I'm not going to bother you with the history of the name). Two of these weapons were installed into the front armour plates of the MG turrets and out of those one I got to glue into the turret itself.






6.9.17

Session I

About the Project reportings

I decided to take a different approach to the reporting this time. I'd typo up a post per each session (building, painting, whatever I did). At the moment each post was going to describe the happenings of a maximum of 45 minutes of something, including every and each unpredictable interruption and whatever happens in a house with kids.

So far I've always done something almost like this but kept some kind of an editorial "let's try to make some sense". In blog post sense that translated into "some posts contained only a part of what I actually did while some aggregated a pile of tiny things".


Most likely I wasn't going to repeat this version of my process, but I felt like trying out this as it had occurred to me.

The glorious first commit

My first constructional session was a pretty low-yield one. I mostly got some hatches done on the rear deck, some tiny details and the main turret's riser. Or whatever you'd call the weirdly shaped coffin, with those vertically bullet-straight thin walls. At this point the whole tank seemed like a figment of some lunatic's imagination.